Southern Pacific Gaea’s island – GaeaLand

The Keeling oscillation of ~7ppm CO2 every six months seems to indicate that there is a considerable variation of the uptake ability of the Northern Hemisphere to capture (and release) CO2. If humanity could simulate 10%-20% of this uptake using the similar mechanisms that the top half of the planet uses – but in the bottom half we could help alleviate some of the inevitable rise to 450ppm.

So the question is, how to simulate the affects of the Northern Hemisphere? How to simulate the taiga and boreal forests in the oceans below 30 degrees south? Simulate but with a mind toward sequestration. Grow huge swaths of kelp that would die and sink every May. Design buoyant mangrove forests that could float across the southern India and Pacific oceans. Imagine building huge rafts of unrecyclable Styrofoam, and plastics, of wood refuse, and whatever else could be cobbled together and floated down and anchored in the South Pacific. Then start growing floating forests there. Imagine the fishery that would spawn (ha) from such an endeavor. Imagine a human made floating forest island the size of Greenland. Gaea’s island – GaeaLand.

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One thought on “Southern Pacific Gaea’s island – GaeaLand

  1. http://qz.com/200087

    In July 2013, the biggest algal bloom ever recorded in China covered 28,900 square kilometers (11,158 square miles) of the Yellow Sea—meaning more than three New York City metro areas of ocean was carpeted in green muck—requiring Qingdao city officials to bulldoze 7,335 tonnes (8,085 tons) of beached scum. A similar incident almost shut down the sailing competition of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. The army dispatched 15,000 soldiers to remove 1 million tons of algae, costing more than $100 million (pdf, p.9).

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